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7 Ways to Earn LTC/Litecoin ASAP

Earning free Litecoin works similarly to earning free Bitcoin. There are several online platforms that give users free Litecoins for performing small tasks or playing online games.
Let’s explore some of the most popular ways to get free Litecoin.

Earn free Litecoin through reputable faucets

The easiest and most popular way to earn free Litecoin is through a Litecoin faucet. A faucet is a website or an application that gives users free crypto coins for completing simple tasks. These tasks are usually easy tasks like completing some captchas, viewing adverts, or playing simple games.
After completing the microtasks, the faucet will reward you with a small amount of Litecoin (Lithoshi). Litoshi is the smallest unit of Litecoin and 1 Lithoshi is equivalent to 0.000000001 Litecoin.
There are various Litecoin faucets out there, many of them being scam faucets. Before you choose a faucet platform, make sure it’s legit. Here, we will highlight a few of the most popular and reputable ones.
It is safe to mention that you should only register on faucets that integrate micro-wallets like Coinpot. Micro-wallets allow you to collect and combine faucet payments easily.

Litecoin Faucet

Just like the previously mentioned faucet, Litecoin Faucet also allows users to earn free Litecoin by solving captchas. You can earn as much as 2,500,000 Litoshis every hour with no daily limitation on the platform.
The unique feature of Litecoin Faucet is that there is no withdrawal limit. Therefore, you can withdraw any amount of Litecoin.
Faucets are sure ways of earning free Litecoin, but you have to be very careful not to fall victim to scams. Before registering on any faucet, look out for the following:
Online reviews to know if it is legit or scam.
Coinpot or Faucethub micro — wallet integration for easy withdrawal.
Deposit before withdrawal feature — This is a typical feature of scam faucets. Faucets are supposed to be free ways to earn Litecoin without any down payment.
Earnings per hour — earnings from faucets are usually small. If a faucet promises an incredible amount of Litecoin, it is probably a scam or total waste of time.
Litecoins earnings from faucets are usually really small. If your earning expectations are high, this might not be the best option for you. There are more lucrative and legit ways to earn free Litecoin. Read on to learn about the other ways to get free Litecoin.

Litecoin cloud mining

Litecoin mining is one of the oldest ways to get free Litecoin. In recent times, earning profits from Litecoin mining can be a major hassle simply because of the cost of setting up the mining device, the cost of electricity, and many other factors.
With the introduction of cloud mining, you can earn free Litecoin without the headaches involved in setting up mining kits. You can find lots of free Litecoin cloud mining contracts online.
All you need to do is download the software on your device to start earning. These software work by using your device’s memory to generate the Litecoin. Which means the more powerful your device, the more free Litecoin you can earn.
However, some of these free Litecoin software contains malicious scripts that can compromise your security by stealing your data. You should only download mining software with great online reviews.
Back when LTC started, it was possible to mine with a standard computer’s CPU or GPU. Unfortunately, as coins grow in both age and popularity, it becomes harder and harder to mine with low-cost equipment. The days of easy mining are over, but that doesn’t mean you still can’t profit from LTC mining.
There are three ways to begin your LTC mining adventure:
Solo mining
Part of a mining pool
Cloud mining

Litecoin lending

Litecoin lending is one of the most lucrative ways to obtain free Litecoin. You can make money by purchasing some Litecoin and lending others on lending platforms.
Lending platforms like Coinloan.io allow you to make as much as 10.5% ROI by lending your LTC. It means if you lend 100 LTC, you earn free 10.5 LTC within a year without doing anything.
By lending your Litecoin, you are making your money work for you. All you need is a trusted and secure lending platform to start earning free Litecoin with this method.

Wager your Litecoin

Another way to get free Litecoin is by wagering your Litecoin. Gambling is not the best way to earn free Litecoin because 70% of gamblers tend to lose more than what they earn.
No doubt that some people have actually managed to become rich through gambling, this, however, is very rare. So if you are a big risk-taker or you really love gambling, Litecoin gambling is one way to earn free Litecoin.
Crypto gambling websites like fortunejack.com, bitstarz.com, and kingbillycasino.com allow you to wager your Litecoin on various casino games. Crypto gambling is probably the riskiest way to earn free Litecoin, and it is not for the faint-hearted.

Invest In Litecoin​

If you’re looking to invest in Litecoin, it’s important to remember that Litecoin is a currency. This means it doesn’t act like a stock or bond. Instead of buying shares of Litecoin, you are swapping your currency for Litecoin currency.
For example, 1 LTC is equal to about $47 USD today. The goal is for the value of Litecoin to rise, in which case, you could exchange your Litecoins back to dollars (from someone willing to do the exchange).​

Referral Links for Crypto Exchanges

This one is good for those out there with friends that are also crypto savvy. Various exchanges offer affiliate programs where you get paid out for inviting your friends and colleagues onto their platform.
Exchanges like Coinbase offer a one time payment when a new person joins their platform while others like Cryptmixer, for example, gives its members an impressive 50% of the revenue from the new clients they bring in. You can also use their exchange to swap the Bitcoin you receive to Litecoin, making it a great way to earn LTC.
submitted by MonishaNuij to MonMonCrypto [link] [comments]

hahhaa doom go brrrr

The date was June 10, 2018. The sun was shining, the grass was growing, and the birds were singing. At least, that’s what I assumed. Being a video game and tech obsessed teenager, I was indoors, my eyes glued to my computer monitor like a starving lion spying on a plump gazelle. I was watching the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) 2018 broadcast on twitch.com, a popular streaming website. Video game developers use E3 as an annual opportunity to showcase any upcoming video game projects to the public. So far, the turnout had been disappointing. Much to my disappointment, multiple game developers failed to unveil anything of actual sustenance for an entire two hours. A graphical update here, a bug fix there. Issues that should have been fixed at every game’s initial launch, not a few months after release. Feeling hopeless, I averted my eyes from my computer monitor to check Reddit (a social media app/website) if there were any forum posts that I had yet to see. But then, I heard it. The sound of music composer Mick Gordon’s take on the original “DooM” theme, the awesome combination of metal and electronic music. I looked up at my screen and gasped. Bethesda Softworks and id software had just announced “DOOM: Eternal”, the fifth addition in the “DooM” video game series. “DOOM: Eternal” creative director Hugo Martin promised that the game would feel more powerful than it’s 2016 predecessor, there would be twice as many enemy types, and the doom community would finally get to see “hell on earth”. (Martin) As a fan of “DOOM (2016)”, I was ecstatic. The original “DooM” popularized the “First Person Shooter (FPS)” genre, and I wished I wouldn’t have to wait to experience the most recent entry in the series. “DOOM(1993)” was a graphical landmark when it originally released, yet nowadays it looks extremely dated, especially compared to “DOOM: Eternal”. What advancements in computer technology perpetuated this graphical change? Computers became faster, digital storage increased, and computer peripherals were able to display higher resolution and refresh rates.
“DooM” 1993 graphics example:
📷(Doom | Doom Wiki)
“DOOM: Eternal” graphics example:
📷
(Bailey)
In their video “Evolution Of DOOM”, the video game YouTube Channel “gameranx” says that on December 10, 1993, a file titled “DOOM1_0.zip” was uploaded on the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server of the University of Wisconsin. This file, two megabytes in size, contained the video game “DooM” created by the game development group “id Software”. (Evolution of DOOM) While not the first game in the “First Person Shooter” (FPS) genre, “DooM” popularized the genre, to the point of any other FPS game being referred to as a “Doom Clone” until the late 1990s. (Doom clones | Doom Wiki) The graphics of the original “DooM” is definitely a major downgrade compared to today’s graphical standards, but keep in mind that the minimum system requirements of “DooM”, according to the article “Doom System Requirements” on gamesystemrequirements.com, was eight megabytes of ram, an Intel Pentium or AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) Athlon 486 processor cycling at sixty-six megahertz or more, and an operating system that was Windows 95 or above. (Doom System Requirements) In case you don’t speak the language of technology (although I hope you learn a thing or two at the end of this essay), the speed and storage capacity is laughable compared to the specifications of today. By 1993, the microprocessor, or CPU (Central Processing Unit) had been active for the past twenty-two years after replacing the integrated circuit in 1971, thanks to the creators of the microprocessor, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore who were also the founder of CPU manufacturer “Intel”. Gordon Moore also created “Moore’s law”, which states “The number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months”. (Moore) Sadly, according to writer and computer builder Steve Blank in his article “The End of More - The Death of Moore’s Law”, this law would end at around 2005, thanks to the basic laws of physics. (Blank) 1993 also marked an important landmark for Intel, who just released the first “Pentium” processor which was capable of a base clock of 60 MHz (megahertz). The term “base clock” refers to the default speed of a CPU. This speed can be adjusted via the user’s specifications, and “MHz” refers to one million cycles per second. A cycle is essentially one or more problems that the computer solves. The more cycles the CPU is running at, the more problems get solved. Intel would continue upgrading their “Pentium” lineup until January 4, 2000 when they would release the “Celeron” processor, with a base clock of 533 MHz. Soon after, on June 19, 2000, rival CPU company AMD would release their “Duron” processor which had a base clock of 600 MHz, with a maximum clock of 1.8 GHz (Gigahertz). One GHz is equal to 1,000 MHz. Intel and AMD had established themselves as the two major CPU companies in the 1970s in Silicon Valley. Both companies had been bitter rivals since then, trading figurative blows in the form of competitive releases, discounts, and “one upmanship” to this day. Moving on to April 21, 2005 when AMD released the first dual-core CPU, the “Athlon 64 X2 3800+”. The notable feature of this CPU, besides a 2.0 GHz base clock and a 3.8 maximum clock, was that it was the first CPU to have two cores. A CPU core is a CPU’s processor. The more cores a CPU has, the more tasks it can perform per cycle, thus maximizing it’s efficiency. Intel wouldn’t respond until January 9, 2006, when they released their dual-core processor, the “Core 2 Duo Processor E6320”, with a base clock of 1.86 GHz. (Computer Processor History) According to tech entrepreneur Linus Sebastian in his YouTube videos “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2009 - 2014 (Part 1)” and “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2015 - 2019 (Part 2)”, AMD would have the upper hand over Intel until 2011, when Intel released the “Sandy Bridge” CPU microarchitecture, which was faster and around the same price as AMD’s current competing products. (Sebastian) The article “What is Microarchitecture?” on the website Computer Hope defines microarchitecture as “a hardware implementation of an ISA (instruction set architecture). An ISA is a structure of commands and operations used by software to communicate with hardware. A microarchitecture is the hardware circuitry that implements one particular ISA”. (What is Microarchitecture?) Microarchitecture is also referred to as what generation a CPU belongs to. Intel would continue to dominate the high-end CPU market until 2019, when AMD would “dethrone” Intel with their third generation “Ryzen” CPU lineup. The most notable of which being the “Ryzen 3950x”, which had a total of sixteen cores, thirty-two threads, a base clock of 3.5 GHz, and a maximum clock of 4.7 GHz. (Sebastian) The term “thread” refers to splitting one core into virtual cores, via a process known as “simultaneous multithreading”. Simultaneous multithreading allows one core to perform two tasks at once. What CPU your computer has is extremely influential for how fast your computer can run, but for video games and other types of graphics, there is a special type of processor that is designed specifically for the task of “rendering” (displaying) and generating graphics. This processor unit is known as the graphics processing unit, or “GPU”. The term “GPU” wasn’t used until around 1999, when video cards started to evolve beyond the literal generation of two-dimensional graphics and into the generation of three-dimensional graphics. According to user “Olena” in their article “A Brief History of GPU”, The first GPU was the “GeForce 256”, created by GPU company “Nvidia'' in 1999. Nvidia promoted the GeForce 256 as “A single-chip processor with integrated transform, lighting, triangle setup/clipping, and rendering engines that is capable of processing a minimum of 10 million polygons per second”. (Olena) Unlike the evolution of CPUs, the history of GPUs is more one sided, with AMD playing a game of “catchup” ever since Nvidia overtook AMD in the high-end GPU market in 2013. (Sebastian) Fun fact, GPUs aren’t used only for gaming! In 2010, Nvidia collaborated with Audi to power the dashboards and increase the entertainment and navigation systems in Audi’s cars! (Olena) Much to my (and many other tech enthusiasts), GPUs would increase dramatically in price thanks to the “bitcoin mania” around 2017. This was, according to senior editor Tom Warren in his article “Bitcoin Mania is Hurting PC Gamers By Pushing Up GPU Prices'' on theverge.com, around an 80% increase in price for the same GPU due to stock shortages. (Warren) Just for context, Nvidia’s “flagship” gpu in 2017 was the 1080ti, the finest card of the “pascal” microarchitecture. Fun fact, I have this card. The 1080ti launched for $699, with the specifications of a base clock of 1,481 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,582 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR5X Vram (Memory that is exclusive to the GPU) according to the box it came in. Compare this to Nvidia’s most recent flagship GPU, the 2080ti of Nvidia’s followup “Turing” microarchitecture, another card I have. This GPU launched in 2019 for $1,199. The 2080ti’s specifications, according to the box it came in included a base clock of 1,350 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,545 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR6 Vram.
A major reason why “DooM” was so popular and genius was how id software developer John Carmack managed to “fake” the three-dimensional graphics without taking up too much processing power, hard drive space, or “RAM” (Random access memory), a specific type of digital storage. According to the article “RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition” on the website TechTerms, Ram is also known as “volatile” memory, because it is much faster than normal storage (which at the time took the form of hard-drive space), and unlike normal storage, only holds data when the computer is turned on. A commonly used analogy is that Ram is the computer’s short-term memory, storing temporary files to be used by programs, while hard-drive storage is the computer’s long term memory. (RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition) As I stated earlier, in 1993, “DooM” required 8 megabytes of ram to run. For some context, as of 2020, “DOOM: Eternal” requires a minimum of 8 gigabytes of DDR4 (more on this later) ram to run, with most gaming machines possessing 16 gigabytes of DDR4 ram. According to tech journalist Scott Thornton in his article “What is DDR (Double Data Rate) Memory and SDRAM Memory”, in 1993, the popular format of ram was “SDRAM”. “SDRAM” stands for “Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory”. SDRAM differs from its predecessor, “DRAM” (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by being synchronized with the clock speed of the CPU. DRAM was asynchronous (not synchronized by any external influence), which “posted a problem in organizing data as it comes in so it can be queued for the process it’s associated with”. SDRAM was able to transfer data one time per clock cycle, and it’s replacement in the early 2000s, “DDR SDRAM” (Dual Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) was able to transfer data two times per clock cycle. This evolution of ram would continue to this day. In 2003, DDR2 SDRAM was released, able to transfer four pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2007, DDR3 SDRAM was able to transfer eight pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2014, DDR4 SDRAM still was able to transfer eight pieces of data per cycle, but the clock speed had increased by 600 MHz, and the overall power consumption had been reduced from 3.3 volts for the original SDRAM to 1.2 volts for DDR4. (Thornton)The digital size of each “ram stick” (a physical stick of ram that you would insert into your computer) had also increased, from around two megabytes per stick, to up to 128 gigabytes per stick (although this particular option will cost you around $1,000 per stick depending on the manufacturer) in 2020, although the average stick size is 8 gigabytes. For the average computer nowadays, you can insert up to four ram sticks, although for more high-end systems, you can insert up to sixteen or even thirty-two! Rewind back to 1993, where the original “DooM” took up two megabytes of storage, not to be confused with ram. According to tech enthusiast Rex Farrance in their article “Timeline: 50 Years of Hard Drives”, the average computer at this time had around two gigabytes of storage. Storage took the form of magnetic-optical discs, a combination of the previous magnetic discs and optical discs. (Farrance) This format of storage is still in use today, although mainly for large amounts of rarely used data, while data that is commonly used by programs (including the operating system) is put on solid-state drives, or SSDs. According to tech journalist Keith Foote in their article “A Brief History of Data Storage”, SSDs differed from the HDD by being much faster and smaller, storing data on a flash memory chip, not unlike a USB thumb drive. While SSDs had been used as far back as 1950, they wouldn’t find their way into the average gaming machine until the early 2010s. (Foote) A way to think about SSDs is common knowledge. It doesn’t contain every piece of information you know, it just contains what you use on a daily basis. For example, my computer has around 750 gigabytes of storage in SSDs, and around two terabytes of internal HDD storage. On my SSDs, I have my operating system, my favorite programs and games, and any files that I use frequently. On my HDD, I have everything else that I don’t use on a regular basis.
“DOOM: Eternal” would release on March 20, 2020, four months after it’s original release date on November 22, 2019. And let me tell you, I was excited. The second my clock turned from 11:59 P.M. to 12:00 A.M., I repeatedly clicked my refresh button, desperately waiting to see the words “Coming March 20” transform into the ever so beautiful and elegant phrase: “Download Now”. At this point in time, I had a monitor that was capable of displaying roughly two-million pixels spread out over it’s 27 inch display panel, at a rate of 240 times a second. Speaking of monitors and displays, according to the article “The Evolution of the Monitor” on the website PCR, at the time of the original “DooM” release, the average monitor was either a CRT (cathode ray tube) monitor, or the newer (and more expensive) LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor. The CRT monitor was first unveiled in 1897 by the German physicist Karl Ferdinand Braun. CRT monitors functioned by colored cathode ray tubes generating an image on a phosphorescent screen. These monitors would have an average resolution of 800 by 600 pixels and a refresh rate of around 30 frames per second. CRT monitors would eventually be replaced by LCD monitors in the late 2000s. LCD monitors functioned by using two pieces of polarized glass with liquid crystal between them. A backlight would shine through the first piece of polarized glass (also known as substrate). Electrical currents would then cause the liquid crystals to adjust how much light passes through to the second substrate, which creates the images that are displayed. (The Evolution of the Monitor) The average resolution would increase to 1920x1080 pixels and the refresh rate would increase to 60 frames a second around 2010. Nowadays, there are high end monitors that are capable of displaying up to 7,680 by 4,320 pixels, and also monitors that are capable of displaying up to 360 frames per second, assuming you have around $1,000 lying around.
At long last, it had finished. My 40.02 gigabyte download of “DOOM: Eternal” had finally completed, and oh boy, I was ready to experience this. I ran over to my computer, my beautiful creation sporting 32 gigs of DDR4 ram, an AMD Ryzen 7 “3800x” with a base clock of 3.8 GHz, an Nvidia 2080ti, 750 gigabytes of SSD storage and two terabytes of HDD storage. Finally, after two years of waiting for this, I grabbed my mouse, and moved my cursor over that gorgeous button titled “Launch DOOM: Eternal”. Thanks to multiple advancements in the speed of CPUs, the size of ram and storage, and display resolution and refresh rate, “DooM” had evolved from an archaic, pixelated video game in 1993 into the beautiful, realistic and smooth video game it is today. And personally, I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for us.
submitted by Voxel225 to voxelists [link] [comments]

Looking back 18 months.

I was going through old emails today and came across this one I sent out to family on January 4, 2018. It was a reflection on the 2017 crypto bull market and where I saw it heading, as well as some general advice on crypto, investment, and being safe about how you handle yourself in cryptoland.
I feel that we are on the cusp of a new bull market right now, so I thought that I would put this out for at least a few people to see *before* the next bull run, not after. While the details have changed, I don't see a thing in this email that I fundamentally wouldn't say again, although I'd also probably insist that people get a Yubikey and use that for all 2FA where it is supported.
Happy reading, and sorry for some of the formatting weirdness -- I cleaned it up pretty well from the original email formatting, but I love lists and indents and Reddit has limitations... :-/
Also, don't laught at my token picks from January 2018! It was a long time ago and (luckliy) I took my own advice about moving a bunch into USD shortly after I sent this. I didn't hit the top, and I came back in too early in the summer of 2018, but I got lucky in many respects.
----------------------------------------------------------------------- Jan-4, 2018
Hey all!
I woke up this morning to ETH at a solid $1000 and decided to put some thoughts together on what I think crypto has done and what I think it will do. *******, if you could share this to your kids I’d appreciate it -- I don’t have e-mail addresses, and it’s a bit unwieldy for FB Messenger… Hopefully they’ll at least find it thought-provoking. If not, they can use it as further evidence that I’m a nutjob. 😉
Some history before I head into the future.
I first mined some BTC in 2011 or 2012 (Can’t remember exactly, but it was around the Christmas holidays when I started because I had time off from work to get it set up and running.) I kept it up through the start of summer in 2012, but stopped because it made my PC run hot and as it was no longer winter, ********** didn’t appreciate the sound of the fans blowing that hot air into the room any more. I’ve always said that the first BTC I mined was at $1, but looking back at it now, that’s not true – It was around $2. Here’s a link to BTC price history.
In the summer of 2013 I got a new PC and moved my programs and files over before scrapping the old one. I hadn’t touched my BTC mining folder for a year then, and I didn’t even think about salvaging those wallet files. They are now gone forever, including the 9-10BTC that were in them. While I can intellectually justify the loss, it was sloppy and underlines a key thing about cryptocurrency that I believe will limit its widespread adoption by the general public until it is addressed and solved: In cryptoland, you are your own bank, and if you lose your password or account number, there is no person or organization that can help you reset it so that you can get access back. Your money is gone forever.
On April 12, 2014 I bought my first BTC through Coinbase. BTC had spiked to $1000 and been in the news, at least in Japan. This made me remember my old wallet and freak out for a couple of months trying to find it and reclaim the coins. I then FOMO’d (Fear Of Missing Out”) and bought $100 worth of BTC. I was actually very lucky in my timing and bought at around $430. Even so, except for a brief 50% swing up almost immediately afterwards that made me check prices 5 times a day, BTC fell below my purchase price by the end of September and I didn’t get back to even until the end of 2015.
In May 2015 I bought my first ETH at around $1. I sent some guy on bitcointalk ~$100 worth of BTC and he sent me 100 ETH – all on trust because the amounts were small and this was a small group of people. BTC was down in the $250 range at that point, so I had lost 30-40% of my initial investment. This was of the $100 invested, so not that much in real terms, but huge in percentages. It also meant that I had to buy another $100 of BTC on Coinbase to send to this guy. A few months after I purchased my ETH, BTC had doubled and ETH had gone down to $0.50, halving the value of my ETH holdings. I was even on the first BTC purchase finally, but was now down 50% on the ETH I had bought.
The good news was that this made me start to look at things more seriously. Where I had skimmed white papers and gotten a superficial understanding of the technology before FOMO’ing, I started to act as an investor, not a speculator. Let me define how I see those two different types of activity:
So what has been my experience as an investor? After sitting out the rest of 2015 because I needed to understand the market better, I bought into ETH quite heavily, with my initial big purchases being in March-April of 2016. Those purchases were in the $11-$14 range. ETH, of course, dropped immediately to under $10, then came back and bounced around my purchase range for a while until December of 2016, when I purchased a lot more at around $8.
I also purchased my first ICO in August of 2016, HEAT. I bought 25ETH worth. Those tokens are now worth about half of their ICO price, so about 12.5ETH or $12500 instead of the $25000 they would be worth if I had just kept ETH. There are some other things with HEAT that mean I’ve done quite a bit better than those numbers would suggest, but the fact is that the single best thing I could have done is to hold ETH and not spend the effort/time/cost of working with HEAT. That holds true for about every top-25 token on the market when compared to ETH. It certainly holds true for the many, many tokens I tried to trade in Q1-Q2 of 2017. In almost every single case I would have done better and slept better had I just held ETH instead of trying to be smarter than Mr. Market.
But, I made money on all of them except one because the crypto market went up more in USD terms than any individual coin went down in ETH or BTC terms. This underlines something that I read somewhere and that I take to heart: A rising market makes everyone seem like a genius. A monkey throwing darts at a list of the top 100 cryptocurrencies last year would have doubled his money. Here’s a chart from September that shows 2017 year-to-date returns for the top 10 cryptocurrencies, and all of them went up a *lot* more between then and December. A monkey throwing darts at this list there would have quintupled his money.
When evaluating performance, then, you have to beat the monkey, and preferably you should try to beat a Wall Street monkey. I couldn’t, so I stopped trying around July 2017. My benchmark was the BLX, a DAA (Digital Asset Array – think fund like a Fidelity fund) created by ICONOMI. I wasn’t even close to beating the BLX returns, so I did several things.
  1. I went from holding about 25 different tokens to holding 10 now. More on that in a bit.
  2. I used those funds to buy ETH and BLX. ETH has done crazy-good since then and BLX has beaten BTC handily, although it hasn’t done as well as ETH.
  3. I used some of those funds to set up an arbitrage operation.
The arbitrage operation is why I kept the 11 tokens that I have now. All but a couple are used in an ETH/token pair for arbitrage, and each one of them except for one special case is part of BLX. Why did I do that? I did that because ICONOMI did a better job of picking long-term holds than I did, and in arbitrage the only speculative thing you must do is pick the pairs to trade. My pairs are (No particular order):
I also hold PLU, PLBT, and ART. These two are multi-year holds for me. I have not purchased BTC once since my initial $200, except for a few cases where BTC was the only way to go to/from an altcoin that didn’t trade against ETH yet. Right now I hold about the same 0.3BTC that I held after my first $100 purchase, so I don’t really count it.
Looking forward to this year, I am positioning myself as follows:
Looking at my notes, I have two other things that I wanted to work into this email that I didn’t get to, so here they are:
  1. Just like with free apps and other software, if you are getting something of value and you didn’t pay anything for it, you need to ask why this is. With apps, the phrase is “If you didn’t pay for the product, you are the product”, and this works for things such as pump groups, tips, and even technical analysis. Here’s how I see it.
    1. People don’t give tips on stocks or crypto that they don’t already own that stock or token. Why would they, since if they convince anyone to buy it, the price only goes up as a result, making it more expensive for them to buy in? Sure, you will have friends and family that may do this, but people in a crypto club, your local cryptocurrency meetup, or online are generally not your friends. They are there to make money, and if they can get you to help them make money, they will do it. Pump groups are the worst of these, and no matter how enticing it may look, stay as far away as possible from these scams. I even go so far as to report them when I see them advertise on FB or Twitter, because they are violating the terms of use.
    2. Technical analysis (TA) is something that has been argued about for longer than I’ve been alive, but I think that it falls into the same boat. In short, TA argues that there are patterns in trading that can be read and acted upon to signal when one must buy or sell. It has been used forever in the stock and foreign exchange markets, and people use it in crypto as well. Let’s break down these assumptions a bit.
i. First, if crypto were like the stock or forex markets we’d all be happy with 5-7% gains per year rather than easily seeing that in a day. For TA to work the same way in crypto as it does in stocks and foreign exchange, the signals would have to be *much* stronger and faster-reacting than they work in the traditional market, but people use them in exactly the same way.
ii. Another area where crypto is very different than the stock and forex markets centers around market efficiency theory. This theory says that markets are efficient and that the price reflects all the available information at any given time. This is why gold in New York is similar in price to gold in London or Shanghai, and why arbitrage margins are easily <0.1% in those markets compared to cryptoland where I can easily get 10x that. Crypto simply has too much speculation and not enough professional traders in it yet to operate as an efficient market. That fundamentally changes the way that the market behaves and should make any TA patterns from traditional markets irrelevant in crypto.
iii. There are services, both free and paid that claim to put out signals based on TA for when one should buy and sell. If you think for even a second that they are not front-running (Placing orders ahead of yours to profit.) you and the other people using the service, you’re naïve.
iv. Likewise, if you don’t think that there are people that have but together computerized systems to get ahead of people doing manual TA, you’re naïve. The guys that I have programming my arbitrage bots have offered to build me a TA bot and set up a service to sell signals once our position is taken. I said no, but I am sure that they will do it themselves or sell that to someone else. Basically they look at TA as a tip machine where when a certain pattern is seen, people act on that “tip”. They use software to see that “tip” faster and take a position on it so that when slower participants come in they either have to sell lower or buy higher than the TA bot did. Remember, if you are getting a tip for free, you’re the product. In TA I see a system when people are all acting on free preset “tips” and getting played by the more sophisticated market participants. Again, you have to beat that Wall Street monkey.
  1. If you still don’t agree that TA is bogus, think about it this way: If TA was real, Wall Street would have figured it out decades ago and we would have TA funds that would be beating the market. We don’t.
  2. If you still don’t agree that TA is bogus and that its real and well, proven, then you must think that all smart traders use them. Now follow that logic forward and think about what would happen if every smart trader pushing big money followed TA. The signals would only last for a split second and would then be overwhelmed by people acting on them, making them impossible to leverage. This is essentially what the efficient market theory postulates for all information, including TA.
OK, the one last item. Read this weekly newsletter – You can sign up at the bottom. It is free, so they’re selling something, right? 😉 From what I can tell, though, Evan is a straight-up guy who posts links and almost zero editorial comments.
Happy 2018.
submitted by uetani to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

EDIT: Per the moderation staff, I'm adding in to the header what I'm using to make it easier for prospective miners.
  1. Go to https://www.nicehash.com/
  2. Create a login
  3. Download their software and run it (this used to be "????")
  4. Profit
Once you reach 0.002 BTC (about 7-10 days on my GTX 1060 + i7-7700k), you can transfer your earnings to Coinbase for free, and cash out. CB does have fees for conversion to Fiat (cash) and your percentage goes down with higher amounts. So don't cash out just because you can. Cash out when you have enough to buy something.
Also a note on taxes. I'm going to keep this simple.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading. Bear with me as I go over this a few more times for typing/grammar. And I look forward to your comments.
submitted by jaykresge to hardware [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

This is a crosspost from /hardware, but I will be editing this independently based on community feedback and guidelines. Prior to posting here, I reached out to your local mod staff to ensure that I wasn't stepping on any toes, given the nature of its content. I hope you find this useful.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading.
submitted by jaykresge to pcgaming [link] [comments]

December 25th CHRISTMAS (Presents from the King)! News on Christmas: MCO, PAY, WAVES, BAY…Tech This Week: BURST, ICX, XVG, STRAT, XEM, ARDR

December 25th CHRISTMAS (Presents from the King)! News on Christmas: MCO, PAY, WAVES, BAY…Tech This Week: BURST, ICX, XVG, STRAT, XEM, ARDR
Ok yesterday with a market that basically tanked I managed to pick 5 of the only green coins out of literally 1200. MCO, PAY, BURST, ICX, and STRAT were all in the green. Picking winners when everything is green is one thing, but when the market is swimming in red and you have the 4 green, it’s a good day.
I appreciate all my loyal followers! For tips and strategy hours before being posted to the message boards follow on Reddit, Instagram: JaketheCryptoKing and Twitter: JbtheCryptoKing. And now on Discord: https://discord.gg/MWBTWFV (join group to reach me directly and see posts early!) Remember in trading minutes matter, hours are eternities.
Let's get to it, Merry Christmas All! News For Christmas: MCO has promised a Christmas bonus. Their twitter is swimming with hints about a KRISTMAS (spelled incorrectly? Bonus!). According to MCO, "We have something special planned for all of you for December 25th and we think you will love it." Their new cards are supposed to be released by January 1, maybe their debit cards (allowing you to exchange crypto for FIAT instantly) are ready?! Check them out online they look GORGEOUS. I have already placed orders for 3/5 of the available ones and I’m #40,000+ I expect MCO to start rolling these cards out, there is absurd demand for them. With surprise Christmas news tomorrow and a working product this month this coin should skyrocket. If you are interested in getting a card rf downloading the ap they are gorgeous: https://get.mona.co/ivwt/tc7kbhig6I
PAY tweeted earlier today about shutting down their system for a short period while they prepared for the Christmas surprise. This confirms we will have Christmas news and from the tone of the tweet, positive news! What could it be?! With many projects and partnerships on the horizon I highly doubt they would release negative news on Christmas this is a must own for tomorrow to find out what news is released!
WAVES’s founder has a livestream occurring on Christmas (not sure how he picked the day) at least everyone will be home to watch it? Either way their NG activation was successful, they have a live stream with the coin founder tomorrow, and a presentation at an enormous Miami Blockchain Convention in January. This is a buy and hold. Not to mention the Binance promotion which in essence is buy and hold WAVES (you lose points if you sell) is in effect for another 3 days and they are having an airdrop and the end of the month. Nothing but positive information here. If you need a Binance account to trade WAVES please use my referral link: https://www.binance.com/?ref=15316928
BAY has hinted at a Christmas surprise for some time now. The crypto coin market is gambling mixed with stock trading. My money is on BAY not disappointing and releasing news worthy of placing it in the 20%+ range with heavy volume.
Now that the “NEWS” section is complete, which is all positive news for today! Let’s begin to discussion on technology. Nothing really creates 100% gains (or more) in the Crypto Markets like technological block chain advances. This is the week’s leaders for this category…
BURST is one of the most unique altcoins on the scene. I wrote about them yesterday and they are here today because on the 27th we get Dymaxion. Do you investors/followers/crytophenes know what one of the biggest problem with mining is? Electricity consumption! BURST changes that by using 400x less electricity then BTC miners. They have their Dymaxion launch this week and their mining platform should revolutionize blockchain tech. BURST uses free memory space instead of CPU, GPU, and ASIC miners using literally less than 0.025% of the electricity when compared to BTC’s mining algorithm. BTC mining uses more electricity than many small nations and BURST will provide an ability to mine at a very low cost while still having a tradable coin on exchanges. Imagine being able to use the free memory on your computer, while you sleep to earn an income, the technology is crazy. I expect this week (their release is the 27th), particularly the next 72 hours to see the biggest BURST gains to date, while leading volume on Bittrex.
NXT (will be in each post until the airdrop, and it went from $.7 when originally recommended to $1.80ish), with the future value of airdrop priced this should trend toward $2.00 or $2.50. As I’m writing this I see it’s spiked over $1.60. That is more then 100% gains in 72 hours, I’ve been screaming to buy NXT in all of my prior posts. Two days ago it popped. The whole market trended downward yesterday. However, NXT should continue to trend toward $2.00+. I just did the math on the IGNIS airdrop, the IGNIS has increased to $4.02 in value, meaning NXT should be worth a minimum of $2.00, a penny more for every penny NXT is worth following the airdrop, price point $2.00-$3.00 depending on if IGNIS continues to appreciate. More people will become interested in “free IGNIS” tokens in the coming days. NXT and the future value of IGNIS should continue to appreciate following Christmas leading up to the airdrop.
ICX was one of the few winners yesterday! Their Mainnet goes live by the end of December which means any day now there will be that 100% pop everyone dreams of. Leading up to that we should receive the hype and anticipation boost on a daily basis. I expect ICX to rally 10% daily until the Mainnet announcement is made with a 100% gain the day of going live! Having a live Mainnet is essential for a viable crypto currency. Welcome to the big leagues ICX.
XVG, VERGE WRAITH PROTCOL (XVG promises this to come out by end of year, plus a very impressive ad came out 4 days ago so I doubt they miss their deadline) anonymity with the flick of a button (public and private ledges in one block chain). By the time you are reading this post it may unfortunately be too late . There is speculation Wraith may be released in the morning. XVG has promised WRAITH will be released by the end of this year, it should hit $.50-$1 range when it does, McAfee although I don’t agree w/him on much he says, states a $15 price target within 6 months of Wraith Protocol being released. I’m saying $1.00 it’s currently $.25 that’s a 400% upswing if I’m right, 4000% if McAfee is. Does it matter really who is correct at that point?
Wraith allows the individual user to determine if they want their balance visible on the block chain or not. Right now we have coins like Monero which are completely anonymous hence their use on the dark web, or ones that are completely public where anyone who knows your wallet address can check your balance. Verge lets each user determine whether to be, public or private, this will revolutionize blockchian and altcoins. If you want to see the impressive link for the Wraith ad here it is: https://youtu.be/dMrk6rozbJg
An article was written today by Bitcoinist highly favorable of Verge, Wraith will make the coin value explode: http://bitcoinist.com/verge-next-bitcoin/.
XEM has been quiet but should NOT go unnoticed. Have you seen yesterday's chart? I suggest you glance at it. Literally no dips, 45degree angle upward. Leading to what.... Catapult, which is version 2.0 of NEM (is to be released by the end of the year). Plus a 4 week hackathon beginning in January. There is nothing better to build awareness and test out their new Catapult network they’ll be releasing this week, then a worldwide hackathon and a new update to their NEM network. XEM will have a pop this week when Catapult goes live, followed by a 4 week awareness rally driven by a worldwide hackathon.
STRAT, is going to have an amazing week. It was one of the only positive performers on a day the market looked like the movie Jaws. They promised that by January, "I can confirm they will be able to host ICO's on our blockchain agnostic platform this year." STRAT is on the cusp of being able to host ICO’s for other companies. This is extremely valuable technology and they’ve announced it will be ready to go this week. Would anyone like to know the going rate of an ICO? 20-40BTC. Per ICO these small companies and their coin holders are making $250k-$600k at the depressed BTC prices. This is a very big business. They’ve also announced 2 Flagship ICOs that will be available on their STRATIS network in January. The platform to host ICOs goes live this week, and within 2 weeks we find out which ICOs STRAT is hosting. This should be a very positive 2 weeks for STRAT.
ARDR’s platform launches Jan 1st. Ardor’s blockchain becomes fully operational Jan 1st., and the Genesis snapshot is announced 1 week in advance. Not to mention all those NXT you’ve been holding for the free IGNIS are used specifically on the ARDR block chain. ARDR should continue to trend upward with NXT and IGNIS leading up to the airdrop. With a new platform and coins to be used on it this will be a positive week for ARDR with exceptionally high returns correlated with the new platform and IGNIS.
I am including some CB predictions as they are a favorite DM topic I’ve received of late. CB Future Picks the same screenshot that showed BCC showed XRP and Monero. CB admits new coins will be added in the next few months. It was speculated in the online community that because CB released wallets for BCC, XRP, and Monero that those would be added next. CB adamantly denies that they planned to add BCC, XRP, and Monero. And then CB added BCC. I fully expect XRP and Monero to be added within 2 months, and that the original rumor they denied had some truth to it. XRP and Monero are buy and holds. Another favorite question is ICOs. ICOs are very difficult because 99% of them are garbage which is why I've only recommended 2, one of which just met it's hard cap for fund :/. The only one left I like is.. Crypterium- The team is unreal and they are presenting at the Dubai Blockchain Intl’ in January. The ICO is also ending very soon! The bonus period ends in 2 days so I highly recommend getting an ether or 2 involved in this. The Dubai Blockchain Intl’ will greatly increase the number of individuals interested in holding Crypterium, (I make $0 off my posts and extensive research if you do purchase the ICOs please use my referral link): https://tokensale.crypterium.io/?ref=4a5381543424516aa2b4e3a6
Some Lovely Followers Requested I Provide Addresses for “Thank You’s and Holiday Cheer” Here are 3 address to help provide my girlfriend with presents so I can spend more time researching! What is 5% of the 200% I earned you this week? (NXT, Verge, MCO, PAY, EMC2, STRAT)
ETH: Address: 0x955A1a68613C028Ea98b0b5dcC58901897EB90DB LTC Address: LSnEW1h1bZwFH67s9tXZVX2GCZHNmzFGVN BTC address: 1GKPSkohnt9pSgBnXRmn2SejQNPWD96qif
Once again, no tips are mandatory but I spend 100’s of hours a week researching to make your investment and my small investment grow! Help spread the love this Holiday Season!
THESE ARE SOLELY STRATEGIES I USE IN THE CRYPTOCURRENCY MARKETS BY NO MEANS AM I TRYING TO PROVIDE INVESTMENT ADVICE. I DO OWN SOME OF THE LISTED CURRENCIES FOR THE REASONS I’VE STATED.
submitted by JakeTheCryptoKing to u/JakeTheCryptoKing [link] [comments]

COSMiC Miner v4.0.1t Update (Windows 64-Bit, nVidia/CUDA)

This is an update to COSMiC V4, an nVidia(CUDA) Token Miner for 0xBTC and other ERC-918 tokens. Users are encouraged to upgrade. Read the rest of this thread or check the README / About/Help Dialog box for info on changes. Enjoy and Happy Hashing :)
** NOTE: this is a very old build! Newest version (4.1.3t) as of this writing, see release thread: https://www.reddit.com/0xbitcoin/comments/c1590e/cosmic_v413t_update_nvidiacuda_win64_guibased/
or the Bitbucket downloads section- latest uploads are at the top: https://bitbucket.org/LieutenantTofu/cosmic-v3/downloads/
** thanks! **

SCREENSHOTS:

DOWNLOAD:

GETTING STARTED VIDEO:

CHANGES THIS VERSION:

FEATURES:

WHAT'S COMING SOON:

COMPATIBILITY:

Should work on nVidia(CUDA) cards Kepler(6xx-series) and up. Tested on Maxwell Gen2(9xx) and Pascal (GTX10x0). Developed on Windows 10. Tested to work on Windows 7 and newer. This is a 64-bit application and expects a 64-bit version of Windows.

HOW TO USE:

This is a brand new miner and as such only runs one GPU per instance. Multi-GPU support coming soon. See below for more info on using multiple GPUs.

MULTI-GPU INSTRUCTIONS:

A WORD ON INTENSITIES:

PERFORMANCE TIPS:

Please let me know what you think and help me to make this the best miner that it can be. :) I can be found here on Reddit or, for a faster response, look for me on the Discord (see sidebar) with the username: @LtTofu [ _Cosmic Miner_ ].
Thanks for your support and feedback!
submitted by LieutenantTofu to 0xbitcoin [link] [comments]

Debunked: "Bitcoin needs to become a store of value before it can be used as a medium of exchange."

Savings and consumption go hand in hand. One is quite useless without the other and if you try to base your money solely on store of value or rapid deflation — basically for sake of seeing a number on a screen appreciate — then you are running a pump scheme desperately looking for others to provide you with the real justification for the exceedingly higher price and you are just as much against sound money as anyone instead preferring to see it depreciate.
This is the case even if you think that you will necessarily have the use value in commerce of that same number created increase in relation to other goods or necessarily keep the same price tag on the global market later when you finally decide to reconfigure it's attributes. The market will not treat your coin the same way once you give it an actual use case besides speculation and there can be no guarantees as to its price once you stop those actions that made it rise in price so far.

Central planning or manipulation of the price system through the introduction of artificial shortages do not make sound money, no matter your intentions or the direction price takes in order to compensate for your shenanigans.

Bubbles form in environments where for one reason or another demand becomes artificially great in relation to supply considering somethings non-speculative use case. What is done to the price of an asset by systematically forcing rapid deflation is the private equivalent of what the central banks of the world do to all other assets when they are devaluing their locally prescribed fiat currency. It may sound better for savers, but is just as unsustainable and in fact erodes the point of regularly increasing ones savings in the first place.
Without having a monopoly, trade in the actual underlying asset thus historically tends to be replaced with much more risky promissary notes used off the record (off chain) and diminish overall in favor off any and all comparable alternatives that provide better liquidity. Trade in the underlying asset may never stop entirely, but it's connection to the rest of the productive economy has significantly worsened and made it's use increasingly unproductive except where absolutely needed.
To quote Objectivist philosopher Ayn Rand, a big proponent of money as a store of value,
Money is a tool of exchange; it represents wealth only so long as it can be traded for material goods and services. Wealth does not grow in nature; it has to be produced by men. . .
. . When people refuse to consider the source of wealth, what they refuse to recognize is the fact that wealth is the product of man’s intellect, of his creative ability, fully as much as is art, science, philosophy or any other human value.
Source: The Objectivist Forum
and
So you think that money is the root of all evil? . . . Have you ever asked what is the root of money? Money is a tool of exchange, which can’t exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. Money is not the tool of the moochers, who claim your product by tears, or of the looters, who take it from you by force. Money is made possible only by the men who produce. Is this what you consider evil?
Source: For the New Intellectual
As per Satoshis design — now arguably better implemented in the form of Bitcoin Cash — bitcoins were always a store of value, because they represented the fungible results of hours of precious computing power that had been consciously expended in order to create them.
They clearly had value to the creator and they also clearly were fungible enough to be divisible into very small pieces and easily passed on to another wallet held by Satoshi himself or by one of his earliest friends to join him in running the network.
The Bitcoin design had been created as the productive response to issues of the past that all stemmed from the problem of having to trust in the reliability of a third party as mediator in any money transactions. It mitigated abusive banking policies and it used competitive market principles rather than a mint or other overseer to keep the network available to any user and drive down the cost of each transaction to the point where it could be free or mostly go completely unnoticed, which would make it usable as cash payment in e-commerce or in person.
There were no "moochers", no arbitrary price manipulation, no central entity that could not be replaced and no price tags preventing small and casual cash-like transactions of any kind.
Any high but limited amount of inflation pressure at the time would have been mitigated by Satoshis own valuation of the importance of these attributes even before he had anyone to trade his coins with and also later when he potentially had, which is exactly how the so called "subjective theory of value" describes prices on a free market.
Economist Ludvig Von Mises, representing the Austrian School of economics and arguably the foremost influence on Rand in this area of thought, had the following to say about money in this regard
In the case of money, subjective use-value and subjective exchange-value coincide.
He also explicitly reminds us that,
Both are derived from objective exchange-value, for money has no utility other than that arising from the possibility of obtaining other economic goods in exchange for it.
Source: The Theory of Money and Credit
But as both Mises and here below Rand are quick to point out, since this means that money is not merely meant to be passed around carelessly (at any rate, slow or fast, cheaply or expensively), the most important function of money is retaining value until it is time to do so, including of course the very moment of the exchange itself. When exactly that time is, can not be allowed to be decided by another human being or by a government-like entity that might be tempted for reasons of controlling such behavior to introduce a tax or a special fee of some kind. Money — the default method of exchange within a network of people, or a community — must still be liquid enough to allow it to be spent cheaply and easily at all times.
Money is the tool of men who have reached a high level of productivity and a long-range control over their lives. Money is not merely a tool of exchange: much more importantly, it is a tool of saving, which permits delayed consumption and buys time for future production. To fulfill this requirement, money has to be some material commodity which is imperishable, rare, homogeneous, easily stored, not subject to wide fluctuations of value, and always in demand among those you trade with.
This leads you to the decision to use gold as money. Gold money is a tangible value in itself and a token of wealth actually produced. When you accept a gold coin in payment for your goods, you actually deliver the goods to the buyer; the transaction is as safe as simple barter. When you store your savings in the form of gold coins, they represent the goods which you have actually produced and which have gone to buy time for other producers, who will keep the productive process going, so that you’ll be able to trade your coins for goods any time you wish.
Source: Philosophy: Who Needs It
Bitcoin fits perfectly into the formula so far described and we may conclude that when it comes to its basic function as money, there is not much more to say in terms of Bitcoin qua the design described in the final edition of Satoshis paper; Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System.

But the story did not end there (a brief but still long overview of the breakdown of the Bitcoin community around Bitcoin Core)

As Bitcoin was already making mainstream appearances time and time again (which it had already started to do while Satoshi was still openly in the community and working on the project), it turned out that many of the remaining developers, as well as those that would arrive later, would completely reject Satoshis views and the design he had proposed. While they likely still keep convincing themselves that they are developing Bitcoin and that their actions have been in the best interest of the project as they see it, they had and still have radically different priorities and the community that formed around them naively competed to rationalize the basis for these priorities among each other and to any newcomers. This resulted in what must carefully be described as a "cult like" atmosphere and lead to a number of debilitating changes in the networks protocol.
Everything started to change. New ideas that went completely against the Bitcoin design started to be made part of the general concerns and everything from scaling, network topology, acceptable fee levels and even transaction speed and reliability were made to perform worse than they used to because of the deep ideological differences that allowed this. The economic understanding of the gradually reduced block rewards for the miners was only one of the many casualties within the community.
According to design, as the tokens of CPU cycles started to spread across the world, the inflation would start to taper off and ultimately at some point in the still distant future ensure that no actively inflating parties were allowed on the network anymore; Thereby safeguarding the limit of 21 million coins and that any price being gradually established during the time of initial distribution would meet up with objective exchange value as per the users in the community and from there remain relatively stable. Then, the plan always was, fees and interest in running the network itself would be the remaining incentive already built into the system to keep it going.
However soon, long before the final stage of the coin distribution which even today still has a really long way to go, developers working on the official reference software implementation that had been named "Bitcoin Core" no longer all expected that this would happen. In fact, not everyone agreed that the system should perform as "cash" at all, but instead perhaps as a "digital gold" or "store of value" that could then still be traded easily, only through other presumably still decentralized means.
That's how it was decided and eventually why increasing the amount of transactions on the network through a simple and safe change of a single parameter was not only considered a potentially unsustainable path to continue down in the long run, but also actually not as high a priority as other factors much less relevant to the systems function as "cash".
Instead of upgrading per the only plan consisted with the original design and as suggested by Satoshi, his successor Gavin Andresen and countless others that eventually would become isolated and for various reasons themselves decide to or be forced to have their role in Bitcoin development further reduced, the block space available for such transactions was kept so low that it eventually got full. This in turn triggered an event in the self-stabilizing transaction fee parameter, the price of which would normally trend as low as it could over time by virtue of being priced in the designs own deflationary native currency and nodes choosing to keep their fees low for sake of internal competition. Now the market in fees traded steadily higher, spiking several times, and with the introduction of features that would let the users more easily increase their fees to have higher chance of being one of the lucky to transact on time, got more and more extreme. At one point it had Greg Maxwell — prominent developer of technologies that would eventually enable "solutions" to this problem, such as the Lightning Network to be deployed as a side chain to what at least ought to be the main chain — supposedly celebrating the event, which he and other developers had already made known was the intent all along.
Personally, I’m pulling out the champaign that market behaviour is indeed producing activity levels that can pay for security without inflation, and also producing fee paying backlogs needed to stabilize consensus progress as the subsidy declines
Source
This in turn, not only priced out all casual and cash type transactions, but also generated a lock-in effect as users could no longer sell what supposedly was still "currency" without loosing a significant portion of their balance or perhaps do anything at all, until the price of the "coins" had trended high enough to compensate for any fees. The now known risks and fees, had spread throughout the system in various ways. For example had fees to and from exchanges increased and the newly developer introduced RBF function also pushed (the one that would allow a user to increase fees, and that was wrongly argued on various occasions to have been part of the original design) made users have to wait for hours or days before their transactions were considered safe. In other words, the system was no longer the one described in the paper and behaved at best more like a typical bank.
But while Bitcoin use for casual and outward facing commerce transactions stagnated, this didn't stop the price rallies that were increasingly driven on by this fee based lack of "liquidity" for recent buyers waiting to sell and fears of missing out on a good investment. It can also be speculated, that not only the lock in-effect for traders looking to ride the price but the high fees on users themselves contributing to a rapid concentration in wealth amongst miners and exchanges, thereby replacing the deflation already brought on by increased difficulty and reduced block rewards with a state of hyperdeflation.
While this may sound good for every bag holder on the onset, it was not so good for the small users looking to spend their coins. Their money store of value had now become more like a time locked interest paying account with a really large withdraw fee.
For those users that did not have much or enough money to even pay the fee in the first place, a single necessary transaction could trigger an event to them comparable to what happened in Cyprus during the height of the financial crisis, as the government had a large portion of savings confiscated as an "emergency tax" directly out of ordinary people's savings accounts. In fact it might be far worse for them than what happened back then, as the sum needed to be paid in fees could be a far greater percentage of their savings and constitute a small fortune depending on where in the world the user had earned and were planning to spend it.
It also did not help at all in the long run that the bull market may draw in more speculating "adopters", since this deflationary mode is only a temporary benefit to traders and doesn't itself necessarily bring any reliable value or relatively stable price at higher levels at all. It can just as well collapse again at any moment and lead to countless losses or by worsening simply rob users of their money by not making it usable on the network anymore.
Instead of viewing this economic policy as merely "testing" the system or "preparing it" for a future without block rewards, you would do better to compare it to "pumping" pretty much any currency, stock or commodity, as the goal even when assuming "good faith" is to centrally plan a restriction on blockspace to below market demand and "happily accept" the result that it manipulates the internal price per byte that is sent upwards. This in combination with already existing speculative interest from the public also almost inevitably leads to significant price moves and in turn even more of the public buying into the bull run before the developers themselves have actually provided anything that should logically attract such increased investment or use interest in the first place.
After the initial pumps it may also be anticipated that corrections in the form of bear markets will tend to set in, as the nodes mempools (the recorded transactions now having to wait in a long que to be timestamped) eventually clears are expected to clear. Because this marks the eventual return to normal fee levels and thus also a temporary stop to increasing deflation. The perceived inflation in turn created by increased liquidity in the underlying asset (on chain) may then set in fast or slow in the markets as some users are finally able to sell for a more reliable asset.
(As soon as speculators have become accustomed to the new prices in the underlying asset itself, its related IOUs and fees relating to both, markets will have stabilized enough that bullish speculation either alone or with the help of the very same processes can start over, yet again and with renewed enthusiasm.)
In the end, the market response will be what the market response will be and you have no control over it. Now that there is Bitcoin Cash, the same is true for it. No guarantees exist or can be made that either of the two chains will remain the more successful one as compared to the other, but the market will be the ultimate arbitrator in the long run.
TLDR: Savings and consumption go hand in hand. Bitcoins were a store of value ever since inception, even when only Satoshi were mining them. All market prices must emerge and be entertained in the market place without top down manipulation through the introduction of artificial scarcity. Pumping prices or letting the various parts of the design malfunction/be fundamentally changed to go against the rest is not sustainable and will only break the incentives model. In the long run the market is the ultimate arbitrator in all matters of money prices.
submitted by fruitsofknowledge to btc [link] [comments]

The Nexus FAQ - part 1

Full formatted version: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16KKjVjQH0ypLe00aoTJ_hZyce7RAtjC5XHom104yn6M/
 

Nexus 101:

  1. What is Nexus?
  2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
  3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
  4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement this?
  5. What is Nexus’ Unified Time protocol?
  6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
 

The Nexus Currency:

  1. How can I get Nexus?
  2. How much does a transaction cost?
  3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
  4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
  5. Is there a cap on the number of Nexus in existence?
  6. What is the difference between the Oracle wallet and the LLD wallet?
  7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
  8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

  1. Can I mine Nexus?
  2. How do I mine Nexus?
  3. How do I stake Nexus?
  4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are trust weight, block weight and stake weight?
 

Nexus 101:

1. What is Nexus (NXS)?
Nexus is a digital currency, distributed framework, and peer-to-peer network. Nexus further improves upon the blockchain protocol by focusing on the following core technological principles:
Nexus will combine our in-development quantum-resistant 3D blockchain software with cutting edge communication satellites to deliver a free, distributed, financial and data solution. Through our planned satellite and ground-based mesh networks, Nexus will provide uncensored internet access whilst bringing the benefits of distributed database systems to the world.
For a short video introduction to Nexus Earth, please visit this link
 
2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
As Nexus has been developed, an incredible amount of time has been put into identifying and solving several key limitations:
Nexus is also developing a framework called the Lower Level Library. This LLL will incorporate the following improvements:
For information about more additions to the Lower Level Library, please visit here
 
3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
Nexus is unique amongst blockchain technology in that Nexus uses 3 channels to secure the network against attack. Whereas Bitcoin uses only Proof-of-Work to secure the network, Nexus combines a prime number channel, a hashing channel and a Proof-of-Stake channel. Where Bitcoin has a difficulty adjustment interval measured in weeks, Nexus can respond to increased hashrate in the space of 1 block and each channel scales independently of the other two channels. This stabilizes the block times at ~50 seconds and ensures no single channel can monopolize block production. This means that a 51% attack is much more difficult to launch because an attacker would need to control all 3 channels.
Every 60 minutes, the Nexus protocol automatically creates a checkpoint. This prevents blocks from being created or modified dated prior to this checkpoint, thus protecting the chain from malicious attempts to introduce an alternate blockchain.
 
4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement it?
To understand what quantum resistance is and why it is important, you need to understand how quantum computing works and why it’s a threat to blockchain technology. Classical computing uses an array of transistors. These transistors form the heart of your computer (the CPU). Each transistor is capable of being either on or off, and these states are used to represent the numerical values 1 and 0.
Binary digits’ (bits) number of states depends on the number of transistors available, according to the formula 2n, where n is the number of transistors. Classical computers can only be in one of these states at any one time, so the speed of your computer is limited to how fast it can change states.
Quantum computers utilize quantum bits, “qubits,” which are represented by the quantum state of electrons or photons. These particles are placed into a state called superposition, which allows the qubit to assume a value of 1 or 0 simultaneously.
Superposition permits a quantum computer to process a higher number of data possibilities than a classical computer. Qubits can also become entangled. Entanglement makes a qubit dependant on the state of another, enabling quantum computing to calculate complex problems, extremely quickly.
One such problem is the Discrete Logarithm Problem which elliptic curve cryptography relies on for security. Quantum computers can use Shor’s algorithm to reverse a key in polynomial time (which is really really really fast). This means that public keys become vulnerable to quantum attack, since quantum computers are capable of being billions of times faster at certain calculations. One way to increase quantum resistance is to require more qubits (and more time) by using larger private keys:
Bitcoin Private Key (256 bit) 5Kb8kLf9zgWQnogidDA76MzPL6TsZZY36hWXMssSzNydYXYB9KF
Nexus Private Key (571 bit) 6Wuiv513R18o5cRpwNSCfT7xs9tniHHN5Lb3AMs58vkVxsQdL4atHTF Vt5TNT9himnCMmnbjbCPxgxhSTDE5iAzCZ3LhJFm7L9rCFroYoqz
Bitcoin addresses are created by hashing the public key, so it is not possible to decrypt the public key from the address; however, once you send funds from that address, the public key is published on the blockchain rendering that address vulnerable to attack. This means that your money has higher chances of being stolen.
Nexus eliminates these vulnerabilities through an innovation called signature chains. Signature chains will enable access to an account using a username, password and PIN. When you create a transaction on the network, you claim ownership of your signature chain by revealing the public key of the NextHash (the hash of your public key) and producing a signature from the one time use private key. Your wallet then creates a new private/public keypair, generates a new NextHash, including the corresponding contract. This contract can be a receive address, a debit, a vote, or any other type of rule that is written in the contract code.
This keeps the public key obscured until the next transaction, and by divorcing the address from the public key, it is unnecessary to change addresses in order to change public keys. Changing your password or PIN code becomes a case of proving ownership of your signature chain and broadcasting a new transaction with a new NextHash for your new password and/or PIN. This provides the ability to login to your account via the signature chain, which becomes your personal chain within the 3D chain, enabling the network to prove and disprove trust, and improving ease of use without sacrificing security.
The next challenge with quantum computers is that Grover’s algorithm reduces the security of one-way hash function by a factor of two. Because of this, Nexus incorporates two new hash functions, Skein and Keccak, which were designed in 2008 as part of a contest to create a new SHA3 standard. Keccak narrowly defeated Skein to win the contest, so to maximize their potential Nexus combines these algorithms. Skein and Keccak utilize permutation to rotate and mix the information in the hash.
To maintain a respective 256/512 bit quantum resistance, Nexus uses up to 1024 bits in its proof-of-work, and 512 bits for transactions.
 
5. What is the Unified Time protocol?
All blockchains use time-stamping mechanisms, so it is important that all nodes operate using the same clock. Bitcoin allows for up to 2 hours’ discrepancy between nodes, which provides a window of opportunity for the blockchain to be manipulated by time-related attack vectors. Nexus eliminates this vulnerability by implementing a time synchronization protocol termed Unified Time. Unified Time also enhances transaction processing and will form an integral part of the 3D chain scaling solution.
The Unified Time protocol facilitates a peer-to-peer timing system that keeps all clocks on the network synchronized to within a second. This is seeded by selected nodes with timestamps derived from the UNIX standard; that is, the number of seconds since January 1st, 1970 00:00 UTC. Every minute, the seed nodes report their current time, and a moving average is used to calculate the base time. Any node which sends back a timestamp outside a given tolerance is rejected.
It is important to note that the Nexus network is fully synchronized even if an individual wallet displays something different from the local time.
 
6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
One of the key limitations of a purely electronic monetary system is that it requires a connection to the rest of the network to verify transactions. Existing network infrastructure only services a fraction of the world’s population.
Nexus, in conjunction with Vector Space Systems, is designing communication satellites, or cubesats, to be launched into Low Earth Orbit in 2019. Primarily, the cubesat mesh network will exist to give Nexus worldwide coverage, but Nexus will also utilize its orbital and ground mesh networks to provide free and uncensored internet access to the world.
 

The Nexus Currency (NXS):

1. How can I get Nexus?
There are two ways you can obtain Nexus. You can either buy Nexus from an exchange, or you can run a miner and be rewarded for finding a block. If you wish to mine Nexus, please follow our guide found below.
Currently, Nexus is available on the following exchanges:
Nexus is actively reaching out to other exchanges to continue to be listed on cutting edge new financial technologies..
 
2. How much does a transaction cost?
Under Nexus, the fee structure for making a transaction depends on the size of your transaction. A default fee of 0.01 NXS will cover most transactions, and users have the option to pay higher fees to ensure their transactions are processed quickly.
When the 3D chain is complete and the initial 10-year distribution period finishes, Nexus will absorb these fees through inflation, enabling free transactions.
 
3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
Nexus reaches consensus approximately every ~ 50 seconds. This is an average time, and will in some circumstances be faster or slower. NXS currency which you receive is available for use after just 6 confirmations. A confirmation is proof from a node that the transaction has been included in a block. The number of confirmations in this transaction is the number that states how many blocks it has been since the transaction is included. The more confirmations a transaction has, the more secure its placement in the blockchain is.
 
4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
The Nexus Embassy, a 501(C)(3) not-for-profit corporation, develops and maintains the Nexus blockchain software. When Nexus began under the name Coinshield, the early blocks were mined using the Developer and Exchange (Ambassador) addresses, which provides funding for the Nexus Embassy.
The Developer Fund fuels ongoing development and is sourced by a 1.5% commission per block mined, which will slowly increase to 2.5% after 10 years. This brings all the benefits of development funding without the associated risks.
The Ambassador (renamed from Exchange) keys are funded by a 20% commission per block reward. These keys are mainly used to pay for marketing, and producing and launching the Nexus satellites.
When Nexus introduces developer and ambassador contracts, they will be approved, denied, or removed by six voting groups namely: currency, developer, ambassador, prime, hash, and trust.
Please Note: The Nexus Embassy reserves the sole right to trade, sell and or use these funds as required; however, Nexus will endeavor to minimize the impact that the use of these funds has upon the NXS market value.
 
5. Is there a cap on the number of NXS in existence?
After an initial 10-year distribution period ending on September 23rd, 2024, there will be a total of 78 million NXS. Over this period, the reward gradient for mining Nexus follows a decaying logarithmic curve instead of the reward halving inherent in Bitcoin. This avoids creating a situation where older mining equipment is suddenly unprofitable, encouraging miners to continue upgrading their equipment over time and at the same time reducing major market shocks on block halving events.
When the distribution period ends, the currency supply will inflate annually by a maximum of 3% via staking and by 1% via the prime and hashing channels. This inflation is completely unlike traditional inflation, which degrades the value of existing coins. Instead, the cost of providing security to the blockchain is paid by inflation, eliminating transaction fees.
Colin Cantrell - Nexus Inflation Explained
 
6. What is the difference between the LLD wallet and the Oracle wallet?
Due to the scales of efficiency needed by blockchain, Nexus has developed a custom-built database called the Lower Level Database. Since the development of the LLD wallet 0.2.3.1, which is a precursor to the Tritium updates, you should begin using the LLD wallet to take advantage of the faster load times and improved efficiency.
The Oracle wallet is a legacy wallet which is no longer maintained or updated. It utilized the Berkeley DB, which is not designed to meet the needs of a blockchain. Eventually, users will need to migrate to the LLD wallet. Fortunately, the wallet.dat is interchangeable between wallets, so there is no risk of losing access to your NXS.
 
7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
Step 1 - Backup your wallet.dat file. You can do this from within the Oracle wallet Menu, Backup Wallet.
Step 2 - Uninstall the Oracle wallet. Close the wallet and navigate to the wallet data directory. On Windows, this is the Nexus folder located at %APPDATA%\Nexus. On macOS, this is the Nexus folder located at ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus. Move all of the contents to a temporary folder as a backup.
Step 3 - Copy your backup of wallet.dat into the Nexus folder located as per Step 2.
Step 4 - Install the Nexus LLD wallet. Please follow the steps as outlined in the next section. Once your wallet is fully synced, your new wallet will have access to all your addresses.
 
8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
You can install your Nexus wallet by following these steps:
Step 1 - Download your wallet from www.nexusearth.com. Click the Downloads menu at the top and select the appropriate wallet for your operating system.
Step 2 - Unzip the wallet program to a folder. Before running the wallet program, please consider space limitations and load times. On the Windows OS, the wallet saves all data to the %APPDATA%\Nexus folder, including the blockchain, which is currently ~3GB.
On macOS, data is saved to the ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus folder. You can create a symbolic link, which will allow you to install this information in another location.
Using Windows, follow these steps:
On macOS, follow these steps:
Step 3 (optional) - Before running the wallet, we recommend downloading the blockchain database manually. Nexus Earth maintains a copy of the blockchain data which can save hours from the wallet synchronization process. Please go to www.nexusearth.com and click the Downloads menu.
Step 4 (optional) - Extract the database file. This is commonly found in the .zip or .rar format, so you may need a program like 7zip to extract the contents. Please extract it to the relevant directory, as outlined in step 2.
Step 5 - You can now start your wallet. After it loads, it should be able to complete synchronization in a short time. This may still take a couple of hours. Once it has completed synchronizing, a green check mark icon will appear in the lower right corner of the wallet.
Step 6 - Encrypt your wallet. This can be done within the wallet, under the Settings menu. Encrypting your wallet will lock it, requiring a password in order to send transactions.
Step 7 - Backup your wallet.dat file. This can be done from the File menu inside the wallet. This file contains the keys to the addresses in your wallet. You may wish to keep a secure copy of your password somewhere, too, in case you forget it or someone else (your spouse, for example) ever needs it.
You should back up your wallet.dat file again any time you create – or a Genesis transaction creates (see “staking” below) – a new address.
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

1.Can I mine Nexus?
Yes, there are 2 channels that you can use to mine Nexus, and 1 channel of minting:
Prime Mining Channel
This mining channel looks for a special prime cluster of a set length. This type of calculation is resistant to ASIC mining, allowing for greater decentralization. This is most often performed using the CPU.
Hashing Channel
This channel utilizes the more traditional method of hashing. This process adds a random nonce, hashes the data, and compares the resultant hash against a predetermined format set by the difficulty. This is most often performed using a GPU.
Proof of Stake (nPoS)
Staking is a form of mining NXS. With this process, you can receive NXS rewards from the network for continuously operating your node (wallet). It is recommended that you only stake with a minimum balance of 1000 NXS. It’s not impossible to stake with less, but it becomes harder to maintain trust. Losing trust resets the interest rate back to 0.5% per annum.
 
2. How do I mine Nexus?
As outlined above, there are two types of mining and 1 proof of stake. Each type of mining uses a different component of your computer to find blocks, the CPU or the GPU. Nexus supports CPU and GPU mining on Windows only. There are also third-party macOS builds available.
Please follow the instructions below for the relevant type of miner.
 
Prime Mining:
Almost every CPU is capable of mining blocks on this channel. The most effective method of mining is to join a mining pool and receive a share of the rewards based on the contribution you make. To create your own mining facility, you need the CPU mining software, and a NXS address. This address cannot be on an exchange. You create an address when you install your Nexus wallet. You can find the related steps under How Do I Install the Nexus Wallet?
Please download the relevant miner from http://nexusearth.com/mining.html. Please note that there are two different miner builds available: the prime solo miner and the prime pool miner. This guide will walk you through installing the pool miner only.
Step 1 - Extract the archive file to a folder.
Step 2 - Open the miner.conf file. You can use the default host and port, but these may be changed to a pool of your choice. You will need to change the value of nxs_address to the address found in your wallet. Sieve_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to use to find primes. Ptest_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to test the primes found by the sieve. As a general rule, the number of threads used for the sieve should be 75% of the threads used for testing.
It is also recommended to add the following line to the options found in the .conf file:
"experimental" : "true"
This option enables the miner to use an improved sieve algorithm which will enable your miner to find primes at a faster rate.
Step 3 - Run the nexus_cpuminer.exe file. For a description of the information shown in this application, please read this guide.
 
Hashing:
The GPU is a dedicated processing unit housed on-board your graphics card. The GPU is able to perform certain tasks extremely well, unlike your CPU, which is designed for parallel processing. Nexus supports both AMD and Nvidia GPU mining, and works best on the newer models. Officially, Nexus does not support GPU pool mining, but there are 3rd party miners with this capability.
The latest software for the Nvidia miner can be found here. The latest software for the AMD miner can be found here. The AMD miner is a third party miner. Information and advice about using the AMD miner can be found on our Slack channel. This guide will walk you through the Nvidia miner.
Step 1 - Close your wallet. Navigate to %appdata%\Nexus (~/Library/Application Support/Nexus on macOS) and open the nexus.conf file. Depending on your wallet, you may or may not have this file. If not, please create a new txt file and save it as nexus.conf
You will need to add the following lines before restarting your wallet:
Step 2 - Extract the files into a new folder.
Step 3 - Run the nexus.bat file. This will run the miner and deposit any rewards for mining a block into the account on your wallet.
For more information on either Prime Mining or Hashing, please join our Slack and visit the #mining channel. Additional information can be found here.
 
3. How do I stake Nexus?
Once you have your wallet installed, fully synchronized and encrypted, you can begin staking by:
After you begin staking, you will receive a Genesis transaction as your first staking reward. This establishes a Trust key in your wallet and stakes your wallet balance on that key. From that point, you will periodically receive additional Trust transactions as further staking rewards for as long as your Trust key remains active.
IMPORTANT - After you receive a Genesis transaction, backup your wallet.dat file immediately. You can select the Backup Wallet option from the File menu, or manually copy the file directly. If you do not do this, then your Nexus balance will be staked on the Trust key that you do not have backed up, and you risk loss if you were to suffer a hard drive failure or other similar problem. In the future, signature chains will make this precaution unnecessary.
 
4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are interest rate, trust weight, block weight, and stake weight?
These items affect the size and frequency of staking rewards after you receive your initial Genesis transaction. When staking is active, the wallet displays a clock icon in the bottom right corner. If you hover your mouse pointer over the icon, a tooltip-style display will open up, showing their current values.
Please remember to backup your wallet.dat file (see question 3 above) after you receive a Genesis transaction.
Interest Rate - The minting rate at which you will receive staking rewards, displayed as an annual percentage of your NXS balance. It starts at 0.5%, increasing to 3% after 12 months. The rate increase is not linear but slows over time. It takes several weeks to reach 1% and around 3 months to reach 2%.
With this rate, you can calculate the average amount of NXS you can expect to receive each day for staking.
Trust Weight - An indication of how much the network trusts your node. It starts at 5% and increases much more quickly than the minting (interest) rate, reaching 100% after one month. Your level of trust increases your stake weight (below), thus increasing your chances of receiving staking transactions. It becomes easier to maintain trust as this value increases.
Block Weight - Upon receipt of a Genesis transaction, this value will begin increasing slowly, reaching 100% after 24 hours. Every time you receive a staking transaction, the block weight resets. If your block weight reaches 100%, then your Trust key expires and everything resets (0.5% interest rate, 5% trust weight, waiting for a new Genesis transaction).
This 24-hour requirement will be replaced by a gradual decay in the Tritium release. As long as you receive a transaction before it decays completely, you will hold onto your key. This change addresses the potential of losing your trust key after months of staking simply because of one unlucky day receiving trust transactions.
Stake Weight - The higher your stake weight, the greater your chance of receiving a transaction. The exact value is a derived by a formula using your trust weight and block weight, which roughly equals the average of the two. Thus, each time you receive a transaction, your stake weight will reset to approximately half of your current level of trust.
submitted by scottsimon36 to nexusearth [link] [comments]

The intelligent investors guide to cryptocurrency: Part 3a - The value proposition

*Introductions: I'm joskye. A cryptocurrency investor and SDC holder. *
...
Hi again. This is the third part in our ongoing series on how to trade better and determine intelligent investments in cryptocurrency for the future.
In part 3 I will now discuss Cryptocurrency valuations, price metrics and identifying coins of value, worth holding.
...
What makes a coin worth holding: The value proposition
What makes anything worth holding? How much of themselves is a person willing to put into it - that's how much.
Cryptocurrency is largely driven by faith. It is a speculative enterprise i.e. people mostly put money into cryptocurrencies believing they will go up in value in the future; their plan to sell at a higher price when it does.
Currently most cryptocurrencies serve no function than being currencies in themselves. Unfortunately these currencies are largely not recognised by governments, most institutional investors or companies are legitimate stores of value or legitimate currencies of transaction. As such legislation and rules around the world regarding them vary considerably and are often absent.
There are very few cryptocurrencies that have legitimised backing, are insured or supported by enterprises that are insured for their loss and essentially there is little to protect you if you lose money through them.
So why do people bother putting money into cryptocurrencies it in the first place?
If the present and future value of a cryptocurrency is driven purely by speculation then you are essentially gambling by putting your money to buy that coin and joining the pool of other gamblers who are doing so. You are essentially joining a ponzi scheme and waiting game hoping you've gotten in early enough and convinced enough people to buy more of the asset you hold at slightly higher prices until a price is reached that you can cash out at (or until that thing becomes so big that everyone starts using it as their store of value).
This type of dynamic essentially underpins the mentality of most investments and trades i.e. buy low and sell high. I'd like to add buy early for investors since buying during a low in an already established asset may be setting yourself up for being forced to sell at a lower low later (especially if you don't understand the fundamentals of that asset).
If however the present or future value of a cryptocurrency is driven by some service other than speculation which can attract and drive fiat currency into it's ecosystem then it is potentially valuable.
I.e. will people actually use their USD/Yuan/Euro/GBP/Yen/INR etc to actually purchase the coin in question to do something useful with it (other than gamble on it's future price).
There are some cryptocurrencies which satisfy this criteria:
...
Bitcoin
It is not a currency, it is a remittance system and store of value. It has a reputation increasingly to being seen as a digital version of gold.
Bitcoin has the cultural and historical advantage of being the first cryptocurrency. It is also still the largest cryptocurrency by a long way with the largest marketcap i.e. price per bitcoin [$952 as of writing] x the number of bitcoin in circulation [16,074,687] which is $15.3 billion. Compare to it's next biggest competitor Ethereum which has a marketcap of $700 million (i.e. only 4.57% of Bitcoin's).
Bitcoin's value proposition is that it is a store of value. It may not be able to sustain this without significant upgrades to it's underlying software.
...
Monero (XMR)
Bitcoin does not have anonymity inherently built into it's software. Therefore if you buy and sell Bitcoin especially on cryptocurrency exchanges (where user registration is required), it is possible to trace whom Bitcoin is being transferred from and to.
For this reason I see Monero as Bitcoin + anonymity. I.e. it's value proposition is as store of hidden wealth. I also believe it does not have the issues that bitcoin does namely, same level of mainstream recognition, spotlight of regulatory awareness and developers do seem to be more focused on achieving better scalability and transaction times (it already does 10-20 minute verification time vs bitcoins 1 hour) which gives it better potential as a currency presently compared to Bitcoin.
-This sort of market cap dwarfs gold. However this type of up-scaled usability will not occur until the transaction verification times are much faster (nanoseconds) and the protocol is enhanced to cope with much larger transactions volumes and frequency at that speed; We are a long way off that.
I do believe fiat stored in Bitcoin will gradually transfer into Monero boosting it's value. I am not sure Monero though can presently bring fresh fiat currency (USD, Yuan etc) into it's ecosystem beyond outsider speculation in future price.
It is not unique in it's function or potential value proposition. My warning about holding Monerofor the long term is that it has competition for it's function not just from Bitcoin itself but from other anonymous coins such as Zcash, DASH (which provides instantaneous settlement) and SDC. Perhaps more importantly, Ethereum (ETH) is now planning to implement optional anonymity (via zSNARKs) in it's transaction network; if it does when combined with Ethereum's own functionality and well defined development roadmap (that will likely several second verification times in late 2017) would render XMR potentially redundant.
...
Ethereum (ETH)
The value proposition for Ethereum is that it allows for complex, trustless settlement systems to be built on it. This is a huge deal because the scope of applications is wide and although the technology needs to mature (to support greater transaction volume, frequency and more secure functionality) the sheer amount of fiat such a platform could attract through conversion of traditional centralised settlement and contract services to more secure decentralised platforms is very huge.
...
Shadowcash (SDC)
The value proposition is a double escrow, fully anonymous, decentralised privacy platform which incorporates private chat, private marketplace and secure, trustless private settlement system into one platform that is fully integrated into it's own blockchain.
Shadowcash already has multiple features that make it an excellent store of value: Low coin supply, potential for great demand, near instantaneous transaction verification times, ability to earn interest for simply holding it.
Shadowcash is incredibly easy to use and is heavily focused on usability. This is absolutely essential to it's end users: customers who seek convenient easy and speedy secure anonymous transaction. This will be a dream come true for traditional users of darknet markets.
To explain why lets elaborate on traditional darknet markets where in order to transact anonymously you have to:
1. Download the TOR browser. 2. Learn how to use it. 3. Buy XMR or Bitcoin. 4. Learn how to transact with these coins *safely* (yes this is still an issue with XMR in spite of it's built in privacy). 5. Learn how to and where to find reliable secure darknet markets. 6. Create accounts on these markets to access them *and* 7. Have faith that the websites and the highly centralised (and thus much more vulnerable) servers hosting those markets you use will not get shut down, not disappear with your money and not betray your transaction details and potentially identities to the authorities should they be infiltrated by them. 
Whereas with Shadowcash's market place this process will become:
1. Download the Shadowcash Umbra client (https://shadowproject.io/en/gettingstarted) 2. Buy some SDC on an exchange and transfer it to your Umbra client. 3. Browse the Shadowcash marketplace and transact securely, safely and anonymously. 
In summary I think Shadowcash can be a very useful application as a privacy platform for private communications and transactions.
...
ICONOMI (ICN)
Those two points constitute it's value proposition. By nature of the way it works it has an easily identifiable P/E ratio based on the amount used to create the fund ($10.5 million) against the current value of that fund based on it's
...
Summary lessons
The first rule in investing or trading in a given cryptocoin is deciding if it has a value proposition:
1. *Can it draw fiat currency (USD, Euro, Yuan etc) in such a way as to give it a valuation that is fully independent of pure speculation?* 2. *Is it unique?* 3. *Is it rare?* A limited supply with a low or negative inflation rate will lead to increasing price as demand goes up. 4. Are there significant risks associated with the value proposition? 
In the next article I will cover lesson 3b: Price metrics and valuations. It will be much shorter I promise but equally informative and we will cover topics such as price determination, impact of speculation, price manipulation, whales and their impact and the impact of bitcoin on the entire cryptocurrency ecosystem.
Finally just to really hammer it home; why am I posting this on the Shadowcash subreddit?
It is because Shadowcash is the best cryptocurrency investment of 2016 and I believe it will be again by March 2017.
...
References:
1. Crypto-Currency Market Capitalizations, https://coinmarketcap.com/, Last Checked 30/01/2017 2. What is the value of all the Gold in the world? http://onlygold.com/Info/All-The-Gold-In-The-World.asp, Last Checked 30/01/2017. 3. ICONOMI Cryptocurrencies Index (ICNX) 21 December 2016 Rebalancing, https://medium.com/iconominet/iconomi-cryptocurrencies-index-icnx-21-december-2016-rebalancing-transformation-into-iconomi-8e31e48493ab#.sptgljv1c 4. ICNx trend chart, https://medium.com/iconominet/iconomi-cryptocurrencies-index-icnx-30-november-2016-monthly-rebalancing-update-3402866243d9#.kw7g4fqcd, Last updated 30th Nov 2017 5. Shadowcash (SDC) - The billion dollar baby!, https://medium.com/@paradox_/shadowcash-sdc-the-billion-dollar-baby-6b86f0660739#.ypz9yme5a, Last updated 16 August 2016. 
...
Disclaimer: I am not responsible for your financial decisions, nor am I advising you take a particular financial position. Rather I am sharing my experiences and hoping you form your own opinions and insights from them. Full disclosure: I have long positions in Ethereum (ETH), Shadowcash (SDC), ICONOMI (ICN), Augur (REP) and Digix (DGD).
submitted by joskye to Shadowcash [link] [comments]

How Many Bitcoin Should You Own? - YouTube Bitcoin Protocol Tutorial: Proof of Work 24 Hours Mining Bitcoin NiceHash Miner Legacy 2018 WARNING: The Truth About Bitcoin - YouTube [Mining bitcoin no zcash e ethereum ] Il software 100% gratis per minare bitcoin

Coinbase - the United States' largest bitcoin exchange - has roughly 100,000 new users willing to buy or sell the digital currency, per Alistair Milne. Coinbase added that as of now, it has as ... The current rate Bitcoin BTC is 45 472.06 zł.In the last 24 hours, the price of Bitcoin increased by 2.46% and the 24-hour volume of this cryptocurrency is 74842003853 zł.The cryptocurrency in the last 24 hours recorded the highest price at the 45 382.43 zł, while its lowest was 44 307.17 zł.The highest Bitcoin price in the last 7 days was 45 382.43 zł, and the lowest price was 43 394.26 zł. The Bitcoin price is increasing at an average of 0.3403% per day over the past year. Try messing with the calculator using different prices. Know your Competition. It may seem easy to just spin up a miner. But you NEED to take a look at just how serious mining is. The video below offers an inside look at one of China’s largest mines. How to Find the Best Bitcoin Miner. There are some ... Bitcoin’s price has begun consolidating following its immense surge seen throughout the past 48 hours Yesterday afternoon, it rallied as high as $13,200 before it found any strong... Cole Petersen 7 hours ago; Trail of Destruction: Bitcoin’s $13,000 Rally Liquidated... Blocks avg. per hour (last 24h) 6: Reward Per Block: 6.25+0.00106 BTG ($52.32 USD) Reward (last 24h) 868.75+0.1478 BTG ($7,273.07 USD) Fee in Reward (Average Fee Percentage in Total Block Reward) 0.02%: Difficulty: 65.724 K +1.83% in 24 hours: Hashrate: 905.971 Khash/s +1.73% in 24 hours: Bitcoin Gold Mining Profitability: 8.0279 USD/Day : for ...

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How Many Bitcoin Should You Own? - YouTube

What it really takes to mine a Bitcoin in 10 Minutes. Firstly I'll show you a special free method to mine Bitcoin and send funds directly to your wallet in 1... Bitcoin's halving, which is coming up this week. Let's also chat about some rumored, scummy behavior from Justin Sun/Tron, Bitcoin mining from countries and more! #Bitcoin #crypto #cryptocurrency This video I show how much I earn Bitcoin after mining 24 hours I only use my GPU - Geforce GTX 780ti & CPU Intel i7-4790k. Lets talk about Bitcoin and what I THINK caused the recent jump in price - enjoy! Add me on Instagram: GPStephan The YouTube Creator Academy: Learn EXACTLY h... 🔴 BITCOIN & STOCKS LIVE: Yesterday's Gains Erased. 🔴 Ep. 937 Crypto Technical Analysis Mitch Ray 607 watching Live now Bitcoin Core Wallet Tutorial - Duration: 8:19.

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